The 735 Year Old Well On Cornhill

Water pumps in the city of London were used to provide citizens with fresh water, and could by siphoned off into troughs for animals to drink from. They could also be used by fire brigades to put out fires in the area – fire brigades were for a long time nothing more than a group of men with a horse and cart.

Here’s a picture of the Cornhill water pump in 1948.

Cornhill-Water-Pump-1
Courtesy of A London Inheritance

But the pump is much, much older than that. An inscription on one side reads:

On this spot a well was first made and a house of correction built thereon. By Henry Wallis Mayor of London. In the year 1282.

Well 1

The house of correction didn’t last and the well was lost. But this wasn’t the end of it, oh no. The opposite side reads:

The well was discovered. Much enlarged. And this pump erected. In the year 1799. By the contributions of the Bank Of England. The East India Company. The neighbouring fire offices. Together with the bankers & traders of the ward of Cornhill.

Well 2

Advertisements

Walking Tour: City of London

The beauty of London is you can walk down a street and immediately be surrounded by history. Sometimes it’s obvious – a plaque on the wall, a date inscribed in stone, a famous building. And sometimes it isn’t – an unassuming blue door behind which a significant event in British history played out.

I have put together a walking tour of the City of London to hit some pretty impressive historical hot-spots.

Continue reading “Walking Tour: City of London”

Who Tried To Destroy Hammersmith Bridge?

Who’s Trying to Blow Up Hammersmith Bridge?

Hammersmith Bridge is one of the weakest bridges in London, but it is also one of the strongest in its ability to stand up to the many people who have – accidentally and purposefully – almost destroyed it since it was first built in 1827.

Continue reading “Who Tried To Destroy Hammersmith Bridge?”

Visit London’s Vibrant Chinatown

Visit London’s Vibrant Chinatown

London’s Chinatown is home to a fantastic array of Asian restaurants serving delicious food. The way they hang cooked poultry in the windows is reminiscent of what restaurants actually do in Hong Kong and China. Having lived in Hong Kong for 6 years, I love to check out the corner shops to snag some old favourite snacks.

Continue reading “Visit London’s Vibrant Chinatown”

“People often refer to Big Ben when they’re talking about the clock tower attached to the Palace of Westminster.

Big Ben is the name of the largest bell, and even that’s a nickname and not an official one. The tower is named the Elizabeth Tower (formerly the Clock Tower), a name it was officially given in 2012 to celebrate Queen Elizabeth II’s diamond jubilee.

The clock is simply known as the Great Clock.”

– Laura Reynolds, The Londonist